Further Evisceration of the Endangered Species Act

Breaking. In a yet to be published document the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), proposes to amend portions of their regulations that implement section 4 of the Endangered Species Act. The proposed revisions set forth a process for excluding areas of critical habitat under section 4(b)(2) of the Act (as amended), "which mandates our … Continue reading Further Evisceration of the Endangered Species Act

Defend the ESA

The Endangered Species Act (ESA), the last barrier to extinction, the most important law in the United States for conserving biodiversity, is under attack, yet again. Since the 115th Congress was sworn in on January 3, 2017, it has already seen the introduction of at least 75 legislative attacks seeking to strip federal protections from … Continue reading Defend the ESA

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Finalizes Rollback of Key Endangered Species Act Protections

Washington, DC—Today, the Trump administration announced new regulations that will effectively gut the Endangered Species Act (ESA), hampering one of the most important environmental laws ever passed. The final regulations to gut critical Endangered Species Act (ESA) protections were announced just months after a U.N. report warned of “unprecedented” and “accelerating” global mass extinctions caused … Continue reading U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Finalizes Rollback of Key Endangered Species Act Protections

No ESA Protection For Alexander Archipelago Wolves

The Department of Interiors' announcement that it will not provide Endangered Species Act protection to the Alexander Archipelago Wolves is a significant one for environmentalists as well as the timber industry in Southeast Alaska. Had the wolf been found worthy of listing, the listing process would have impacted timber sales throughout the Tongass National Forest. One cannot help but speculate that the logging industry swayed this decision.

HSUS Condemns Oregon’s Cougar and Wolf Decisions

“Yesterday’s decision to delist wolves was not only premature, but also follows a disturbing pattern of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Commission waging war against our native carnivores. Last month, the Commission voted to allow trophy hunters and federal wildlife agents to kill more cougars and now it’s wolves facing arbitrary decisions that fly in the face of ethical conservation, ignore the best available science and are out of touch with modern society. These decisions are not aligned with responsible management and ignore Oregonian values.”