Tongass National Forest/Roadless Rule

References U.S. Forest Service, “Addressing Climate Change on the Tongass,” (2011) available at https://drive.google.com/file/d/1dThpcdjYh6VPySAv8-dz64VV2vdeXS-2/view?usp=drivesdk Marc Heller, “Old or young growth? Tongass logging at a crossroads,” E&E News, October 7, 2019, available at https://www.eenews.net/stories/1061191089 U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service and the State of Alaska, “Memorandum of Understanding Between the State of Alaska and the United … Continue reading Tongass National Forest/Roadless Rule

Speak Up For Ancient Forests, Wolves, and Wildlife in Alaska.

To reconcile the ecological value of the ancient forests in Alaska with their economic value as timber is unconscionable for numerous reasons, including the existential threat of climate change. On October 15th, 2019, the Trump administration took a significant step toward opening the world’s largest intact temperate rainforest to logging and other potential extractive development. … Continue reading Speak Up For Ancient Forests, Wolves, and Wildlife in Alaska.

THE LONG-TERM IMPACTS OF LOGGING AND ROADS PUSH A TONGASS WOLF POPULATION TOWARD EXTINCTION

A 75% DECLINE IN 20 YEARS Wolves are a symbol of wilderness and ecological integrity. They are important in their own right and as a key part of a functioning predator- prey system. In Southeast Alaska, wolves bring significant economic benefits to communities as part of the package that lures more than one million visitors … Continue reading THE LONG-TERM IMPACTS OF LOGGING AND ROADS PUSH A TONGASS WOLF POPULATION TOWARD EXTINCTION

Tweetsheet: Save the Roadless Rule⁠—Alaska

Once again, the Forest Service has disregarded the evidence of the probable impacts of its timber program on wolves, other wildlife populations, salmon, and critical habitat necessary for their survival.
As we have seen on Prince of Wales, logging and roads initiate many harmful effects, including the “overharvest” and illegal take of not only wolves, but also their primary prey and sustenance, Sitka black-tailed deer.